UW Medical Education Day 2024

Madison, WI US
May 30, 2024

Overview

We are excited to announce that the annual Medical Education Day is open for 2024 registration! This event is free and open to all UWSMPH faculty and staff, and will feature professional development opportunities, engaging workshops and poster presentations that highlight education initiatives and innovations. THE PROGRAM FORMAT IS LIVE, IN-PERSON. There is not a virtual option for the program.

Please register early! The registration deadline is May 24!

Location

Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC)
University of Wisconsin–Madison Campus
750 Highland Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin

Intended Audience

This activity is intended for state-wide faculty and staff who teach in undergraduate medical education. Attendees also include clinical faculty who teach residents and fellows, in addition to physicians, physician assistants, physical therapists, faculty from population health sciences and genetic counseling, and other interested health care professionals.

Global Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, members of the healthcare team will be able to:

  • Utilize effective teaching and learning best practices
  • Network with colleagues who teach at UWSMPH and across the state of Wisconsin
  • Discuss current and planned UWSMPH initiatives, programs and innovations

Elements of Competence

This continuing education (CE) activity has been designed to change learner competence and focuses on the American Board of Medical Specialties areas of practice-based learning and improvement, and interpersonal and communication skills, in addition to the interprofessional competency of communication.

To Register

Click the red Register/Enroll button.

 

 

Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 3.00 AAPA Category 1 CME
  • 3.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • 3.00 University of Wisconsin–Madison Continuing Education Hours
    • 3.00 Approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
Registration opens: 
04/19/2024
Course expires: 
07/15/2024
Event starts: 
05/30/2024 - 8:30am CDT
Event ends: 
05/30/2024 - 2:30pm CDT
Cost:
$1.00
Rating: 
0

UW Medical Education Day 2024

May 30, 2024

Agenda

AM 
8:30-9:00Registration and Refreshments, Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC) Atrium
9:00-10:30PLENARY SESSION (1335 HSLC)
 Presentation of Dean's Teaching Awards and Dean's Award for Excellence in Medical Student Research Mentorship, Elizabeth Petty, MD, Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, UW School of Medicine and Public Health
 

Keynote Address: Promoting an Inclusive Learning Environment: Recent Insights from Diversity Science, Markus Brauer, PhD, Executive Director, Institute for Diversity Science and Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Madison

10:30-10:45Break and Transition
10:45-11:45MORNING WORKSHOPS (please choose one)
 

A) AI Shouldn't Mean "Ain't Interested": Embracing ChatGPT's Utility for Educators, Amanda DeVoss, MMS, PA-C; Kevin Wyne, PA-C, MPAS, MSc; Michelle Ostmoe, BS
HSLC Classroom

ChatGPT is an innovative new technology that has the potential to revolutionize medical education. The software, created by OpenAI in 2022, is a form of generative AI where users can enter prompts to receive human-like responses and composed written content. Its use is growing exponentially by both students and faculty throughout the world. While the use of ChatGPT and similar programs raise appropriate concerns related to academic integrity, the accuracy of data, and detriments to learning, the technology can also provide tremendous support to educators. Specifically, ChatGPT can be utilized as an interactive reference framework, facilitate the development of history-taking and problem-solving skills, create virtual patient cases, and help create competency-based assessments among other applications. Indeed, the technology can help educators assess hard-to-measure skills such as critical thinking, creative problem solving, and clinical reasoning. We invite all medical educators, both new and seasoned, to this workshop. In this focused session, we will review the rise of generative AI, introduce the audience to ChatGPT, and highlight what early educational adopters are saying about the technology. We will also share our personal experiences using the tool to create lecture objectives, assist with recommendation letters, and develop student assessments among other tasks. Participants will then have the opportunity to try out the technology using guided prompts that demonstrate ChatGPT’s capabilities.

Objectives:

  • Provide background about generative artificial intelligence (AI), specifically chatbots such as ChatGPT
  • Discuss the potential applications and benefits of using ChatGPT in medical education
  • Discuss how ChatGPT can be used for information retrieval, the creation of lecture objectives, letters of recommendation, clinical scenarios, and other faculty tasks
  • Provide hands-on exercises for participants to explore how ChatGPT can be utilized for various faculty and administrative tasks
  • Discuss how faculty can critically evaluate the performance and limitations of ChatGPT and ensure responsible AI use in medical education
 

B) Incorporating Disability into Medical Education: Considering Competency and Disability Conscious Care, Melissa Villegas, MD; Jaclyn Bender, MS, OTR/L; Helen Rottier, MS
HSLC Classroom

Patients with disabilities are a nationally recognized population with health disparities. Most, if not all, healthcare providers will encounter patients with disabilities in their future practice. Incorporating disability specific education into medical education can improve knowledge and competency in caring for these future patients with a goal of improving care. This workshop will explore ways in which clinical educators and curriculum developers can further incorporate disability competency into medical education with a goal of disability conscious care. All educators are welcome to attend this workshop who would like to increase their knowledge on how to incorporate disability into medical education. This workshop will explore models of disability, considerations for disability competent care, and disability identity through framing presentation followed by large group discussion of ways in which disability education are currently being implemented by participants. In small groups, participants will be asked to assess current curricula and educational strategies for ways in which disability education could be further incorporated with the goal of concrete and actionable strategies educators can utilize moving forward.

Objectives:

  • Describe ableism, models of disability, and disability identity
  • Analyze challenges and successes in incorporating disability education into medical education
  • Identify concrete strategies for incorporating disability education
 

C) It's a Joint Effort: Exploring Innovation in Rheumatology Education, Christine Sharkey, MD; Sarah Donohue, MD
HSLC Classroom

Rheumatology is a unique subspecialty with medical nuance, a high degree of complex clinical decision making and multifaceted patient centered care which can lead to learner intimidation. Often undergraduate (UME) and graduate medical education (GME) learners on the in-patient Rheumatology consult service, outpatient Rheumatology rotation and within medical residency programs describe decreased confidence with topics in rheumatology. We seek to change this common belief with curricular innovation and tailored teaching practices to a new generation of learners. This workshop will feature the structure of our 2023-2024 Rheumatology curriculum, the curriculum learning cycle that we utilize to ensure Internal Medicine resident competency in Rheumatology and innovative techniques including gamification, repetition, and reward to reinforce knowledge. This workshop will be interactive with a pre-survey, breakout groups with audience participation in a game and group think activity.  Educators from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. We seek to share our collective experience to help improve medical education curriculum for all stages of learners.

Objectives:

  • Identify ways in which curricular innovation and tailored teaching practices can support a new generation of learners
  • Participate in innovative teaching techniques to reinforce knowledge among undergraduate (UME) and graduate medical education (GME) learners
  • Produce curricular innovation and collaboration that can lead to the production of scholarly work and publication
 

D) Question and Answer Session with Keynote Speaker Dr. Markus Brauer, Markus Brauer, PhD
HSLC Classroom

Join our keynote speaker for a more personal conversation. Dr. Brauer will answer your questions focused on themes that emerged from his keynote address.

 

E) Responding to Learners' Ideas and Contributions with Curiosity and Joy, Amy Zelenski, PhD; Lisa Barker, PhD
HSLC Classroom

A positive learning climate fosters curiosity and risk-taking, which can be difficult to cultivate in the competitive atmosphere of medical education. Students and faculty see the utility of asking questions to assess and teach, but students can perceive wrong answers as too risky and therefore shut down (Rucker et al. 2023). All students can be preoccupied with image management and students who have been underrepresented in medicine have the additional stress of stereotype threat (Lo and Regehr 2016, Steele 2011). These preoccupations can put learning in the backseat. So, how can we encourage contributions from students even–and perhaps especially–when they are not sure of the answer? Improvisational theatre techniques can help! Improv can be used to teach collaboration, empathy, and communication skills–all of which are essential to teaching in the dynamic clinical environment (Gao 2018). Additionally, applied improv has the potential to teach adaptability, attunement, and advancement (Chan et al. 2023). All faculty, staff and students involved in our statewide campus will find value in this workshop regardless of teaching context and learner level. Session attendees will participate in and reflect upon interactive activities that exercise the principles of improvisational theatre, with a focus on how improv principles apply to creating psychological safety in the classroom.

Objectives:

  • Articulate the central principles of improvisational theatre, including making others look good by saying "yes, and . . ." to their ideas
  • Use "yes, and . . ." to make space for and work with mistakes
  • Explain how these principles apply to psychological safety and to the ways instructors respond to learners' ideas and questions
11:45-12:30POSTER SESSION (3110 HSLC)
PM 
12:30-1:15Lunch and Networking Activities (3110 HSLC)
1:30-2:30AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS (please choose one)
 

A) Casting a Wider Net in the Resident Selection Process: Practical Steps You Can Take to Increase Diversity, Anna Momont, MD; Tetyana Schneider, PhD; Beverly Hutcherson, MS
HSLC Classroom

This workshop provides tools to increase the diversified candidate pool in resident selection. Resident selection is a complex process with competing priorities. Program Directors, along with their selection committees, wish to identify candidates that will be academically and clinically successful.  At the same time, UWSMPH GME along with medical programs aim to recruit underrepresented in medicine (URiM), diverse residents and fellows.  However, personal and institutional biases can prevent interest from and inclusion of qualified URiM candidates for resident positions.  It is important to refine our recruitment and selection processes in order to increase diverse representation in the physician workforce and improve health outcomes. This workshop is valuable to those involved in resident and medical student selection. In this workshop we will present evidence of the importance of increasing diversity in the resident pool and healthcare workforce.  We will discuss the challenges of the resident selection process including specific examples from our department (ophthalmology) and then through sharing from workshop attendees.  We will share practices that our program has used to improve recruitment of URiM candidates and brainstorm ideas considering the current landscape and experiences of URiM candidates. 

Objectives:

  • Describe barriers and challenges in selecting underrepresented in medicine (URiM) candidates for residency positions
  • List strategies and activities that can improve recruitment and selection of URiM candidates
  • Apply the tools from this workshop and identify next steps towards improving your program selection process
 

B) CLIMATE Change: Focus on Inclusive Learning Environments, Anne Stahr, PhD; Sara Johnson, MD; Sushant Srinivasan, MD; Megan Heneke, JD; Elizabeth Petty, MD; Nancy Raymond, MD
HSLC Classroom

Inclusive and supportive learning environments–or climates–are critical for health sciences learners and teachers to engage authentically and achieve the best learning outcomes. To foster a positive learning environment is to foster high-quality learning. This workshop focuses on a new novel and adaptable CLIMATE framework developed at SMPH. The CLIMATE framework includes pedagogical underpinnings, specific application examples, and summary pro tips. The CLIMATE elements for teachers are to: Consider the context for your learners; Lean into the learning process; highlight that Identities matter, Make space for safety, Attend to community, Teach inclusively and Engage and energize. This workshop will consist of reviewing the CLIMATE framework, hands-on small group activities with discussions, and reflections on current teaching and ideas on how the CLIMATE framework can be tailored to each unique teaching session and group of learners. We encourage attendees to review the asynchronous online Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) module (approx. 45 mins with CME) called Education Essentials - Cultivate an Inclusive Learning CLIMATE which describes the CLIMATE framework, pre and/or post workshop.

Objectives:

  • Define learning climate, contributing factors, and why it matters for effective teaching
  • Reflect on teaching and learning experiences for applying the CLIMATE framework
  • Identify CLIMATE approaches to be inclusive and promote learning
  • Practice CLIMATE strategies in cases to foster inclusive and optimal learning climates
  • Develop a plan to try 1-2 new skills to enhance learning climate in your own teaching
 

C) More Than "Keep Trying, It Will Come with Practice": Using the "Coach Approach" with a Struggling Learner, Kelly Herold, MD; Jane Crone, NP, MEd, MS; Andrew Schaefer, MD; Elzabeth Fleming, MD; Erin Fouch, MD
HSLC Classroom

Identification of individual learners’ goals, academic performance and development of professional identities fostered “coach-coachee” relationships to help students reach their fullest potential. As student needs become more varied, a coach‘s collection of techniques need additional skill sets. The purpose of this workshop is to define the role and function of a “coach” in contrast to an advisor, mentor, or teacher. Emphasis will be focused on the “coach-coachee” relationship where the process of some coaching techniques can be demonstrated and practiced by attendees. Intended for all medical educators, the relevance of utilizing competencies within their coaching provides effective methods leading to successful outcomes for learners. A learner’s ability to reflect, analyze and identify their goals will require this growth of their coach. During this workshop, we will outline several techniques that exemplify coaching competencies and participants will have opportunities to practice the different techniques.  

Objectives:

  • Compare the different roles of Teacher, Mentor, Advisor, Coach
  • Explore communication focused coaching competencies
  • Describe various “Coach- Approach“ techniques, such as: Identify learner personal values; Employ Co-creative Brainstorming; Cultivate student emotional intelligence
  • Demonstrate use of these techniques in a simulated setting
 

D) Providing Actionable Feedback on Professionalism, Deborah Simpson, PhD; Kjersti Knox, MD; Theresa Frederick, LSSGB; Jacob Bidwell, MD
HSLC Classroom

Feedback is an integral part of the learning process; it allows the recipient to remain on course in reaching their learning goals per 1983 JAMA article. Yet, our medical education literature is replete with evidence that our feedback is low quality. Providing actionable feedback is hard. We are often able to advise learners about their current performance – but not provide the additional details that enable learners to act on their feedback. Professionalism focused feedback often suffers from the same ills as other feedback. It’s not actionable (eg, that was unprofessional). The focus is non-specific, there is no goal state, no steps/strategies, or resources to improve. When faculty or learners are viewed as unprofessional it adversely affects teaching, learning and patient care. This workshop will provide a brief overview of actionable feedback and will utilize the ABIM’s professionalism elements (eg, altruism, accountability, excellence, duty, honor/integrity, respect for others) to help specify the professionalism element associated with the observed behaviors. This workshop is explicitly designed to allow workshop participants the opportunity to practice giving actionable feedback about professionalism in a “safe space” with the shared expectation that we can learn together.

Objectives:

  • Identify the critical elements of actionable feedback
  • Reframe observed behaviors into specific professional elements to enhance clarity of feedback
  • Provide actionable feedback about professionalism professionally
 

E) Through the Looking Glass: Using Mirroring and Reverse Mirroring to Work with Challenging Emotions, Sarah Floden, MD; Shobhina Chheda, MD, MPH; Amy Zelenski, PhD; Julia Yates, MSSW, LCSW; Mariah Quinn, MD, MPH
HSLC Classroom

Teachers and mentors benefit from learning skills to navigating intense emotions that impact communication with learners and mentees. Mirroring, a hard-wired neural activity, functions to help us understand what another person is feeling by matching their non-verbal communication and facilitates a synergistic rapport (Neal 2011). However, there are circumstances in which reverse mirroring may be more helpful, aiding our communication partner (and ourselves) in physiologic regulation and calming. For example, when someone’s emotions are overwhelming or distressing, we both may benefit from our emotional presence being lesser and calmer, such as sitting quietly while the other person paces. This type of response requires intentional effort and practice. Workshop participants will engage in dynamic, structured verbal and non-verbal tasks designed to cultivate flexibility to engage in concordant or reverse mirroring. Applied improvisation pedagogy utilizes exercises/games to help participants connect the material to their own lives. Subsequent structured debriefs will elicit insights gained and promote sharing with others in the session. We will also demonstrate how we situate these communication skills in trainings for the UW Health Peer Support Program, a multidisciplinary volunteer group that supports clinicians and trainees as they navigate burnout, stress, or challenging situations.

Objectives:

  • Reflect on experiences of using mirroring when communicating with learners or mentees
  • Describe specific circumstances in which mirroring or reverse mirroring are likely to be beneficial
  • Explain how improv activities can be used to teach skills in mirroring to aid in emotional regulation and understanding
  • Utilize one applied improv activity in further teaching about emotional connections
2:30Adjourn

 

UW Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC)
750 Highland Avenue
Madison, WI 53705
United States

Planning Committee

Amy Stickford Becker, MA

Shobhina Chheda, MD, MPH

Nicole Dunbar

Michelle Ostmoe, BS

Nancy Raymond, MD

Katy Rosko, BS

Christie Seibert, MD

Anne Stahr, PhD

Elizabeth Tuschen, MBA

Susan Wenker, PT, PhD, MS, FNAP

Presenters

Keynote Presenter

Markus Brauer, PhD, Executive Director, Institute for Diversity Science and Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Madison

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Lisa Barker, PhD

Jaclyn Bender, MS, OTR/L

Jacob Bidwell, MD

Shohbina Chheda, MD, MPH

Jane Crone, NP, MEd, MS

Amanda DeVoss, MMS, PA-C

Sarah Donohue, MD

Elizabeth Fleming, MD

Sarah Floden, MD

Erin Fouch, MD

Theresa Frederick, LSSGB

Megan Heneke, JD

Kelly Herold, MD

Beverly Hutcherson, MS

Sara Johnson, MD

Kjersti Knox, MD

Anna Momont, MD

Michelle Ostmoe, BS

Elizabeth Petty, MD

Mariah Quinn, MD, MPH

Nancy Raymond, MD

Helen Rottier, MS

Andrew Schaefer, MD

Tetyana Schneider, PhD

Christine Sharkey, MD

Deborah Simpson, PhD

Sushant Srinivasan, MD

Anne Stahr, PhD

Melissa Villegas, MD

Kevin Wyne, PA-C, MPAS, MSc

Julia Yates, MSSW, LCSW

Amy Zelenski, PhD

Policy on Faculty and Sponsor Disclosure

It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin–Madison Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) to identify, mitigate, and disclose all relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies* held by the speakers/presenters, authors, planners, and other persons who may influence the content of this accredited continuing education (CE).  In addition, speakers, presenters, and authors must disclose any planned discussion of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation. For this accredited continuing education activity all relevant financial relationships have been mitigated and detailed disclosures are listed below.

*Ineligible companies are those whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by, or on, patients. The ACCME does not consider providers of clinical services directly to patients to be ineligible companies.

 

NAME

 

ROLE(S)

 

FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS DISCLOSURE

DISCUSSION OF UNLABELED/UNAPPROVED USES OF DRUGS/DEVICES IN PRESENTATION

Lisa Barker, PhD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Jaclyn Bender, MS, OTR/L

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Jacob Bidwell, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Marcus Brauer, PhD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Shohbina Chheda, MD, MPH

Committee Member, Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Jane Crone, NP, MEd, MS

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Amanda DeVoss, MMS, PA-C

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Sarah Donohue, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Nicole Dunbar

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Elizabeth Fleming, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Sarah Floden, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Erin Fouch, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Theresa Frederick, LSSGB

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Megan Heneke, JD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Kelly Herold, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Beverly Hutcherson, MS

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Sara Johnson, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Kjersti Knox, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Cathy Means

Planner

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Anna Momont, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Michelle Ostmoe, BS

Committee Member, Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Elizabeth Petty, MD

Committee Member, Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Mariah Quinn, MD, MPH

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Nancy Raymond, MD

Committee Member, Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Katy Rosko, BS

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Helen Rottier, MS

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Andrew Schaefer, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Tetyana Schneider, PhD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Christie Seibert, MD

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Christine Sharkey, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Deborah Simpson, PhD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Sushant Srinivasan, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Anne Stahr, PhD

Committee Member, Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Amy Stickford Becker, MA

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Elizabeth Tuschen, MBA

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Melissa Villegas, MD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Susan Wenker, PT, PhD, MS, FNAP

Committee Member

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

N/A

Kevin Wyne, PA-C, MPAS, MSc

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Julia Yates, MSSW, LCSW

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

Amy Zelenski, PhD

Speaker

No relevant relationships with ineligible companies to disclose

No

 

Discloser List CME Internal Report

 

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

In support of improving patient care, the University of Wisconsin–Madison Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Credit Designation Statements

American Medical Association (AMA)

The University of Wisconsin–Madison ICEP designates this live activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA)

The University of Wisconsin–Madison ICEP has been authorized by the American Academy of PAs (AAPA) to award AAPA Category 1 CME credit for activities planned in accordance with AAPA CME Criteria. This activity is designated for 3 AAPA Category 1 CME credits. PAs should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

The University of Wisconsin–Madison ICEP, as a member of the University Professional & Continuing Education Association (UPCEA), authorizes this program for .3 continuing education units (CEUs) or 3 hours.

Available Credit

  • 3.00 AAPA Category 1 CME
  • 3.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • 3.00 University of Wisconsin–Madison Continuing Education Hours
    • 3.00 Approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Cost:
$1.00
Please login or register to take this course.

Accessibility

The University of Wisconsin provides equal opportunities in employment and programming, including Title IX requirements. The University of Wisconsin fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA and the rules and regulations thereof. If any participant in this educational activity is in need of accommodations, please notify us at help@icep.wisc.edu

Program Changes

Emergency situations occasionally occur and may necessitate topic or speaker changes. The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and the University of Wisconsin–Madison ICEP reserve the right to alter or substitute a topic or speaker without prior notification.

Questions About Registration

Email help@icep.wisc.edu.

For Further Information

For conference information please contact Elizabeth Tuschen at eatuschen@wisc.edu or Cathy Means at cathy.means@wisc.edu